Saturday, April 27, 2013

Victorian Era Breaches of Etiquette


When calling, assume an easy, genteel attitude, be self-possessed, cultivate an easy flow of language and happy expression of thought, study of cultured society, and the general laws of etiquette.

It is a breach of etiquette to stare round the room when you are making a call.

It is a breach of etiquette to remove the gloves when making a formal call.

It is a breach of etiquette to take a dog with you when calling, however "dear or interesting," as no dog can be admitted to the drawing-room.

A breach of etiquette to bring either of them when calling.
 It is a breach of etiquette to take a child with you when paying calls.

It is a breach of etiquette for a caller who is waiting the entrance of the hostess to open the piano, or to touch it if it is open.

It is a breach of etiquette to go to the room of an invalid unless invited.

It is a breach of etiquette to look at your watch when calling.

It is a breach of etiquette to walk around the room when waiting for your hostess, examining the furniture or pictures.

It is a breach of etiquette for a caller to open or shut a door, raise or lower a window curtain, or in any way alter the arrangement of a room.


It is a breach of etiquette to turn your chair so as to bring your back to some one seated near you.

It is a breach of etiquette when making a call, to play with any ornament in the room, or seem to be aware of anything but the company present.

It is a breach of etiquette during a call, to draw near the fire to warm your hands or feet, unless you are invited by the mistress of the house to do so.

It is a breach of etiquette to remain when you find the host or hostess dressed to go out.


 
Dressed for calling. A breach of etiquette to fool with that you are holding.

It is a breach of etiquette to fidget with the hat, cane, or parasol during a call.

It is a breach of etiquette for a caller to preface his or her departure by remarking "Now I must go," or insinuating that the hostess is weary of the visitor.

It is a breach of etiquette to resume your seat after having once left it to say adieu.

 
Ignoring one in your company is a breach of etiquette.


It is a breach of etiquette for a lady receiving several callers to engage in a tete-a-tete conversation with one.

It is a breach of etiquette to make remarks upon a caller who has just left the room, whether made by the hostess or other visitors.

It is a breach of etiquette and a positive unkindness to call upon a friend in reduced circumstances, with any parade of wealth in equipage or dress.

It is a breach of etiquette for the hostess to leave the room when visitors are present.
Many breaches of etiquette in this gathering.

 It is a breach of etiquette to assume any ungraceful or uncouth positions, such as standing with the arms akimbo, sitting astride a chair, smoking in the presence of ladies, wearing the hat, leaning back in the chair, standing with legs crossed or feet on the chairs, leaning forward in the chair with elbows on the knees,— all these acts stamp you as ill-bred and unpolished.



No comments:

Post a Comment